According to some Christian outlooks we were made for another world. Perhaps, rather, we were made for this world to recreate, reclaim, redeem, and renew unto God's future aspiration by the power of His Spirit. - R.E. Slater
Secularization theory has been massively falsified. We don't live in an age of secularity. We live in an age of explosive, pervasive religiosity... an age of religious pluralism. - Peter L. Berger
Exploring the edge of life and faith in a post-everything world. - Todd Littleton
I don't need another reason to believe, your love is all around for me to see. – anon
Thou art our need; and in giving us more of thyself thou givest us all. - Khalil Gibran, Prayer XXIII
Be careful what you pretend to be. You become what you pretend to be. - Kurt Vonnegut
Religious beliefs, far from being primary, are often shaped and adjusted by our social goals. - Jim Forest
People, even more than things, need to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed; never throw out anyone. – anon
Certainly God's love has made fools of us all. - R.E. Slater
An apocalyptic Christian faith doesn't wait for Jesus to come, but for Jesus to become in our midst. - R.E. Slater
Christian belief in God begins with the cross and resurrection of Jesus, not with rational apologetics. - Eberhard Jüngel, Jürgen Moltmann
Our knowledge of God is through the 'I-Thou' encounter, not in finding God at the end of a syllogism or argument. There is a grave danger in any Christian treatment of God as an object. The God of Jesus Christ and Scripture is irreducibly subject and never made as an object, a force, a power, or a principle that can be manipulated. - Emil Brunner
Ehyeh Asher Ehyeh means "I will be that who I have yet to become." - God (Ex 3.14)
Our job is to love others without stopping to inquire whether or not they are worthy. - Thomas Merton
The church is God's world-changing social experiment of bringing unlikes and differents to the Eucharist/Communion table to share life with one another as a new kind of family. When this happens we show to the world what love, justice, peace, reconciliation, and life together is designed by God to be. The church is God's show-and-tell for the world to see how God wants us to live as a blended, global, polypluralistic family united with one will, by one Lord, and baptized by one Spirit. – anon
The cross that is planted at the heart of the history of the world cannot be uprooted. - Jacques Ellul
The Unity in whose loving presence the universe unfolds is inside each person as a call to welcome the stranger, protect animals and the earth, respect the dignity of each person, think new thoughts, and help bring about ecological civilizations. - John Cobb & Farhan A. Shah
If you board the wrong train it is of no use running along the corridors of the train in the other direction. - Dietrich Bonhoeffer
God's justice is restorative rather than punitive; His discipline is merciful rather than punishing; His power is made perfect in weakness; and His grace is sufficient for all. – anon
Our little [biblical] systems have their day; they have their day and cease to be. They are but broken lights of Thee, and Thou, O God art more than they. - Alfred Lord Tennyson
We can’t control God; God is uncontrollable. God can’t control us; God’s love is uncontrolling! - Thomas Jay Oord
Life in perspective but always in process... as we are relational beings in process to one another so life events are in process in relation to each event... as God is to Self, is to world, is to us... like Father, like sons and daughters, like events... life in process yet always in perspective. - R.E. Slater

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

The Pilgrim's Mayflower Compact, c.1620

Mayflower Compact's relevance to us today
http://sentinelsource.com/opinion/editorial/the-mayflower-compact-s-relevance-to-us-today/article_caec3cdb-afd2-5857-866a-1f7c2c78ba4c.html

New Hampshire Sentinel Source.com
November 23, 2011

On the day before Thanksgiving it’s worth looking at a document that has a close tie to the holiday: The Mayflower Compact. This was the 200-word statement that was put on paper while the Mayflower lay at anchor in Provincetown harbor after a long and difficult passage across the Atlantic Ocean.

The Compact, which was signed by all 41 adult males on board, has a relevance today, though not for some of the reasons that have been claimed.

For example some see in the Compact a precedent for the Constitution that emerged more than a century-and-a-half later and that, with amendments, still guides us. But one would be hard put to find much literal connection between the spare document of 1620 and the detailed diagram of self-governance of 1787 [effected a 167 years later].

And some argue that the Compact, by its very language, establishes the United States as a Christian nation; in that case, the statement’s words and circumstances would also certify the nation as forever a subject of the British monarchy, controlled only by males and given to appropriation of other people’s lands.

We see a different meaning to the nation in the historic statement that was signed aboard the Mayflower, particularly in light of our current state of affairs. Consider the actual language:

“In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord, King James, by the Grace of God, of England, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, e&. Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern parts of Virginia; do by these presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the General good of the Colony; unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of November, in the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini, 1620.”

The meaning of those words that principally resonates today is this: We are all in the same boat.

More than a few passengers on the Mayflower were surprised by where they had landed, having expected to wind up a couple of hundred miles to the south, and they threatened to leave. The Compact formally bound them into a single community where they were, and reinforced the original ambition to establish a settlement together. Notable is the commitment to “covenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politick,” with emphasis on the word “civil.”

The history books spell out how hard and sometimes imperfect that commitment turned out to be. But a shared mission it was, despite individual differences or preferences, with everyone working together toward a common goal. A worthy Thanksgiving ideal.


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THE MAYFLOWER COMPACT
Signed by the Pilgrims in 1620
Showing Full Reference to God & the Christian Faith


In 1620, a small group of pilgrims arrived in New England and wrote out
the Mayflower compact creating their own community
"for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith."

Modern Transcription:

In the name of God, Amen. We, whose names are underwritten, the Loyal Subjects of our dread Sovereign Lord, King James, by the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, etc.


Having undertaken for the Glory of God, and Advancement of the Christian Faith, and the Honour of our King and Country, a voyage to plant the first colony in the northern Parts of Virginia; do by these Presents, solemnly and mutually in the Presence of God and one of another, convenant and combine ourselves together into a civil Body Politic, for our better Ordering and Preservation, and Furtherance of the Ends aforesaid; And by Virtue hereof to enact, constitute, and frame, such just and equal Laws, Ordinances, Acts, Constitutions and Offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meet and convenient for the General good of the Colony; unto which we promise all due Submission and Obedience.

In Witness whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names at Cape Cod the eleventh of November, in the Reign of our Sovereign Lord, King James of England, France and Ireland, the eighteenth, and of Scotland the fifty-fourth. Anno Domini, 1620″


Mayflower Compact, Nov. 11, 1620
Literal Transcription:

"In ye name of God, Amen. We whose names are underwritten, the loyal subjects of our dread sovereign Lord King James by ye grace of God, of Great Britaine, Franc, & Ireland king, defender of ye faith, &c.


Haveing undertaken, for ye glorie of God, and advancemente of ye Christian faith, and honour of our king & countrie, a voyage to plant ye first colonie in ye Northerne parts of Virginia, doe by these presents solemnly & mutualy in ye presence of God, and one of another, covenant & combine our selves togeather into a civill body politick; for our better ordering & preservation & furtherance of ye ends aforesaid; and by vertue hearof, to enacte, constitute, and frame shuch just & equall lawes, ordinances, acts, constitutions, & offices, from time to time, as shall be thought most meete & convenient for ye generall good of ye Colonie: unto which we promise all due submission and obedience. In witnes wherof we have hereunder subscribed our names at Cap-Codd ye .11. of November, in ye year of the raigne of our soveraigne lord King James of England, France, & Ireland ye eighteenth, and of Scotland ye fiftie fourth. Ano: Dom. 1620."

PILGRIMS’ WRITINGS – Early Christian records of the U.S. history

THE PILGRIMS WROTE JOURNALS NARRATING THEIR EXPERIENCES – God was central to their lives.


“OF PLIMOTH PLANTATION” written by the Pilgrim Governor William Bradford

(Bradford was Governor of the Pilgrams for over 30 years)
e-book: History of Plymouth Plantation 1606-1646 (PDF)
e-book: History of Plymouth Plantation, 1620-1647


This journal “Of Plimoth Plantation” was written by Pilgrim Governor William Bradford – check the Massachusetts Records, here, here, and here

The Massachusetts State House stores the hand-written journal of Mayflower Captain and Pilgrim Governor William Bradford where he narrates the first years of the Pilgrim colony at Plymouth. The Pilgrims sailed from England on the Mayflower and arrived in Massachusetts in 1620 where Bradford served as the colony’s first governor. Bradford wrote an account of the settlement from 1620 to 1646, titling it “Of Plimoth Plantation.”
The hand-written journal describes the voyage of The Mayflower and the Pilgrims’ experience settling in Plymouth

Originally titled “The Log of the Mayflower” contains an account as narrated by Mayflower Captain William Bradford who was one of the Company of Englishmen who left England in April 1620 in the ship known as “The Mayflower.” He also narrates the circumstances leading to their prior Settlement in Holland, their return to England and subsequent departure for New England, their landing at Cape Cod in December 1620, their Settlement at New Plymouth and their later history for several years.

This record is an invaluable source for the early history of Massachusetts and the United States.

The manuscript contains a copy of the Mayflower Compact (the original copy, written on board of the Mayflower, no longer exists), a list of passengers who sailed on the vessel. (p19)


PILGRIMS’ WRITINGS – Thanksgiving to God

THE FIRST THANKSGIVING AT PLYMOUTH – to honor God for His deliverance and providence.

As narrated by the Pilgrim, Captain and Governor William Bradford in his manuscript “Of Plymoth Plantation” (originally titled “The Log of the Mayflower”).

PILGRIMS GAVE THANKS TO GOD

● The grateful Pilgrims therefore declared a three-day feast in December 1621 to thank God and to celebrate with their Indian friends.
● It is primarily from the Pilgrim’s Thanksgiving celebration of 1621 that we derive the current tradition of Thanksgiving Day.



Modern transcription:

And thus, they found the Lord to be with them in all their ways, and to bless their outgoings & incomings, for which let his holy name have the praise for ever, to all posterity.

They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty. For as some were thus employed in affairs abroad, others were exercised in fishing, about cod and bass and other fish, of which they took good store, of which every family had their portion. All the summer there was no want; and now began to come in store of fowl, as winter approached, of which this place did abound when they came first (but afterward decreased by degrees). And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports.”

"Mourt's Relation" by Pilgrim Edward Winslow
“MOURT’S RELATION” written by Pilgrim Governor Edward Winslow, 1621

(Mourt was Governor of the Pilgrims several times)
e-book: Mourt’s Relation or Journal of the Plantation at Plymouth (PDF)


Modern transcription:

our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.

This journal Mourt’s Relation was:

- Written primarily by Pilgrims and Mayflower passengers: Edward Winslow, William Bradford.

- Written between November 1620 and November 1621.

- Describes the landing of the Pilgrims at Cape Cod, their exploring and eventual settling at Plymouth, their building of the Colony, their relations with the surrounding Indians, including the First Thanksgiving.

- Originally printed in 1622 under the tile A Relation or Journal of the English Plantation settled at Plymouth, is the first published account of the coming of the Pilgrims to the New World to settle Plymouth Plantation.



Pilgrims embrace Capitalism
(from the journal of Pilgrim William Bradford)

PILGRIMS & CAPITALISM
PILGRIMS FIND SUCCESS IN CAPITALISM

(as written by the Pilgrim’s second Governor, William Bradford)

Pilgrims corn production increased when each family was assigned a parcel
● For the Pilgrims, life was a constant battle for survival. Later, Governor William Bradford made a decision. Instead of the colonists sharing their crops equally, he assigned a parcel of land to each family and told them they could keep whatever they produced for themselves.

● ‘This had very good success, for it made all hands industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been.’ If you can keep everything you make, of course you’re going to work harder….
Modern transcription:

All this while no supply was heard of, neither knew they when they might expect any. So they began to think how they might raise as much corn as they could, and obtain a better crop than they had done, that they might not still thus languish in misery. At length, after much debate of things, the Governor (with the advice of the chiefest amongst them) gave way that they should set corn every man for his own particular, and in that regard trust to themselves; in all other things to go on in the general way as before. And so assigned to every family a parcel of land, according to the proportion of their number, for that end, only for present use (but made no division for inheritance) and ranged all boys and youth under some family. This had very good success, for it made all hands very industrious, so as much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could use, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better content. The women now went willingly into the field, and took their little ones with them to set corn; which before would allege weakness and inability; whom to have compelled would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.more
For More Informatino on the History of Thanksgiving in America:

History of Thanksgiving in America
Celebrating Thanksgiving in America
What is the origin of America’s annual Thanksgiving Day?

Embarkation of The Pilgrims (painting on south side of the Rotunda in the United States Capitol Building)
Embarkation of The Pilgrims
(painting in the U.S Capitol Building)
Mayflower
by Bernard Gribble
The Mayflower at Sea
by Margeson
Thanksgiving Pilgrims
First Thanksgiving
by Jean Louis Gerome Ferris
Colonization of New England by Costaggini – Frieze in the U.S. Capitol
Early settlers cut and saw trees and use the lumber to construct a building.
Many others are giving praises to God.
Thanksgiving Thanking the Christian God
The First Thanksgiving
by Jennie A. Brownscombe
Pilgrims Signing the Mayflower Compact by Edward Percy Moran
Signing the Mayflower Compact
by Edward Percy Moran



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For More Information on the




For More Information on the
Discovery and Settlement of America





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